1,500,000,000,000,000,000 Operations per second for COVID-19

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1,500,000,000,000,000,000 Operations per second for COVID-19

Folding @ home has announced that the cumulative computing performance of the systems participating in the project has exceeded 1.5 ExaFLOPS, or 1,500,000,000,000,000,000 floating point operations per second. The level of performance currently available to Folding @ home participants is an order of magnitude higher than that of the world’s most powerful supercomputer.

Currently, the cumulative performance of active CPUs and GPUs (which have returned units of work in the last 50 days) participating in the Folding @ home project exceeds 1.5 ExaFLOPS, which is 10 times faster than the performance of the IBM Summit supercomputer compared with 148.6 PetaFLOPS. To get there, Folding @ Home had to employ 4.63 million CPU cores and nearly 430 thousand GPUs. Considering the nature of distributed computing, not all CPU cores and GPUs are always online, so the performance available for Folding @ home projects will vary depending on hardware availability.

Folding @ home CPU and GPU active
Reported Wednesday March 25, 2020 11:04:31 PM GMT

AMD GPU
NVIDIA GPU
CPU
CPU core
TFLOPS
x86 TFLOPS
windows
75823
314952
474277
3588315
680371
1384998
Linux
3,675
41113
78124
811997
85028
167152
Mac OS


41582
230198
2,578
2,578
Total
79498
356065
593983
4630510
767977
1554728
Note:
CPUs and GPUs that have returned units of work in the past 50 days are considered active.

The outbreak of COVID-19 has burdened numerous computational and chemical biology projects. IBM recently formed its COVID-19 high-performance computing consortium that brings together the major supercomputers managed by various research institutes and technology companies in the United States to perform research simulations in epidemiology, bioinformatics and molecular modeling. The cumulative performance of the supercomputers participating in IBM’s HPC COVID-19 consortium is 330 PetaFLOPS.

The Folding @ home distributed computing project uses computational skills to perform protein dynamics simulations in an attempt to better understand them and find cures for various diseases. Recently F @ H has started to carry out simulation projects of theoretically dopable protein targets from SARS-CoV-2, which have attracted a lot of attention since SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 are clearly the hottest topics these days.

We at AnandTech also have our Folding @ Home team, which is currently competing against our sister site Tom’s Hardware. If you have a spare GPU that isn’t too old, think about joining us in our battle. We are team 198.

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Source: Folding @ Home Twitter