Lizzy Boden’s Case: Menstruation or Murder-Did the Suspect Clearly Hide Blood Evidence?

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Lizzy Boden's Case: Menstruation or Murder-Did the Suspect Clearly Hide Blood Evidence?

Correspondent Erin Moriarty and “ 48 Hours ” investigated a double murder case that occupied the country, and a very cold incident that “ Lizzy Boden aired Anne Ax ” on CBS on 10 / 9c on Saturday, March 28 Was newly observed. .

That is a fact. Many people scream when talking about body functions such as women’s menstruation. So did the young suspect take advantage of that discomfort and escape with two murders? Did she know that a male investigator wouldn’t look into her and she cleared the traces of blood and released evidence? That can explain why events that occurred more than a century ago continue to puzzle criminal professionals to this day.

The suspect in question is Lizzie Borden. On the morning of August 4, 1892, Lizzie’s father, Andrew Borden, and her stepmother, Abbey, were found killed in a family home in Fall River, Mass. They were both killed by sharp objects that were considered hatchets.

Lizzy Borden

Fall River Historical Society

Lizzie, 32, soon became the main suspect, with both motivation and opportunity. She hated her stepmother and decided to inherit millions of dollars today from her father’s death. In addition, Lizzy Borden stayed home without a reliable alibi while her sister Emma was visiting friends at the time of the murder and was a few miles away. Investigations have reported that the day before the murder, a woman identified as Lizzy attempted to purchase cyanide for remediation, she said, on the seal cape. The suspicious pharmacist refused to sell it to her.

Situational evidence pointed to Lizzie. Still, where was the blood? Investigators were puzzled by the lack of blood evidence linking Lizzie to murder. Abbey Boden, first killed in a second-floor bedroom, was beaten 19 times. Andrew was beaten while sleeping on the sofa and beaten several times in his head. If Lizzie was a murderer, wouldn’t she be covered in blood splashes? Did she leave a trace of blood? Neighbors who came home shortly after Andrew died had not seen blood on Lizzie or her clothes. Two days after the murder, police searched the house but found no bloody clothes. The only blood found in Lizzy Borden was a small spot on the underskirt.

In fact, there could have been evidence of the clean-up all the time before the police, and they downplayed it. When investigators searched the house, they encountered something that looked like a bloody cloth or rag in a basement bucket. The investigator took her to her words and did not actually look into the bucket, a fact confirmed by a family physician when Lizzie pointed out that menstruation had occurred. Later, the family housekeeper, Brigitte Sullivan-doing a family laundry early in the week-wondered why she was not looking at the tub at the time, but it was too late.

In fact, if the bucket contains evidence of a crime scene cleanup, the person who put those rags there is obviously planning murder and will deal with the physical function of the famous male female. Hated It may have been a wonderful plan that not only helped get rid of Lizzy Borden’s killings, but also captivated us all with crimes that were really unresolved.

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