Longtime NCAA basketball players from Syracuse said the COVID-19 is bigger than the couch

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Longtime NCAA basketball players from Syracuse said the COVID-19 is bigger than the couch

Posted: Mar 26, 2020 / 06:50 PM EDT / Updated: Mar 26, 2020 / 06:50 PM EDT

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (WSYR-TV) – This weekend, the NCAA will identify four clubs that will play for men’s basketball contests, but that is canceled like many other college competitions.

As it is at this time of year long NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament Pat Driscoll will be working on one of the 16 or Elite 8 games, but not this year.

Driscoll has been in charge of the NCAA Basketball Tournament for 19 years now, including the fourth straight game at the 2015 National Championship.

As for sitting now, it’s not a job he tells NewsChannel 9, “It’s a compromise. I think most college basketball players will have the same ideas, but as we said before, this is a lot bigger. basketball. “

It all started for Driscoll when he was sitting in Madison Square Garden two weeks ago, and by this point, the family was only allowed to watch this Big East Tournament as Coronavirus was really starting to grow.

Driscoll’s last night’s matchup was held at MSG and was there to watch St.John’s event in Creighton.

He said, “After seeing so many seats missing, I think it’s a clear indication that this is a good business and there are some things going on here,”

As the two teams entered the locker room for half-time, following several other gatherings, the Big East announced at the time that, in the middle of the game, the competition was canceled.

That is the end of the season for players, coaches, and arbitrators across the country.

On the first day of the NCAA Coalition Driscoll spent time volunteering at Bank of Central New York.

“I don’t want to go through as if I were going down myself, at the same time being able to do things on the first day of the tournament shows that there is more need now than college basketball.”

Driscoll also told NewsChannel 9 another point of thinking about the COVID-19 pandemic is that he knows some college basketball legislators have tested positive for this virus.